Archives

A Guide to the Implementation Process: Stages, Steps, and Activities

(Published 2014, March) | Useful to Parent Centers and SSP staff involved in SSIP work and the implementation of evidence-based practices for systems change

Implementation science is the study of the processes needed to bring new practices into widespread use. These recommendations and process described in this guide are based on findings from implementation science. The guide describes how to apply implementation science to improve child and family outcomes in early childhood education programs, including early intervention and preschool.

Parent Centers and state and local personnel can benefit from knowing about implementation of science and utilizing it in planning the systems improvement strategies and processes to be used to improve outcomes for children with disabilities.

Download the guide from:
http://ectacenter.org/~pdfs/implementprocess/implementprocess-stagesandsteps.pdf

Also available:

Glossary of Terms | Http://ectacenter.org/implementprocess/glossary.asp

State-level Self-Assessment | Http://ectacenter.org/implementprocess/state-selfassess.asp

Local-level Self-Assessment | Http://ectacenter.org/implementprocess/local-selfassess.asp

PowerPoint Presentation | Http://ectacenter.org/~ppts/implementprocess/guide_to_the_implementation_process_2014-07-29.pptx

More about Implementation Science
To improve outcomes, an evidence-based practice or innovation must be selected, and the process of implementing that practice or innovation must be effective. Yet, changing policies or guidelines, and providing information and training alone are not adequate to bring about sustainable changes in practice. To adopt evidence-based practices, the implementation process must also address the organizational supports that are necessary to initiate and sustain the practices with fidelity. The following stages of implementation are described in the guide:

  • Exploration
  • Installation
  • Initial implementation
  • Full implementation
  • Expansion and scale-up

Each stage has specific steps and associated activities. While the stages, steps, and activities suggest a linear sequence of events, in actual implementation there is often more dynamic flow to the work. Some stages or steps may occur simultaneously, and the work often circles back to earlier stages. The guide also looks at implementation drivers such as technical leadership and adaptive leadership, organizational supports, and personnel development mechanisms-which must be aligned with and support the new practices to be adopted.

Involving Teens and Young Adults in Selecting Assistive Technology

(2016) | Useful to Parent Centers, families, youth with disabilities, and educators working with students with disabilities who could benefit from using assistive technology.

This 4-page resource helps families involve teens and young adults in learning about and selecting assistive technology (AT). An important goal for older students is to understand the areas in which technology can support them in their educational and employment goals. The tip sheet encourages  students to advocate for themselves, and to take an active role in selecting assistive technology to address their needs.

The tip sheet is a product of the Center on Technology and Disability (CTD) and the PACER Center.

Access the tip sheet at:
http://ctdinstitute.org/library/2017-02-14/involving-teens-and-young-adults-selecting-assistive-technology

See also the 7-page companion guide called Getting Started: Exploring Assistive Technology (AT) with Your Teen or Young Adult, at:
http://ctdinstitute.org/library/2017-02-15/getting-started-exploring-assistive-technology-your-teen-or-young-adult

 

Getting Started: Exploring Assistive Technology with Your Teen or Young Adult

(2016) | Useful to Parent Centers, families, youth with disabilities, and educators working with students with disabilities who could benefit from using assistive technology.

This 7-page guide offers steps for families to take with their teens and young adults to get them involved in the process of exploring assistive technology (AT). When youth take an active role in choosing their own AT tools, they are more likely to find things that will work well for their individual needs. Steps discussed include:

  • understanding self-advocacy,
  • incorporating AT into an IEP or 504 plan,
  • finding ways to try out different tools, and
  • evaluating the impact of AT.

The guide is a product of the Center on Technology and Disability (CTD) and the PACER Center.

Access the Getting Started guide at:
http://ctdinstitute.org/library/2017-02-15/getting-started-exploring-assistive-technology-your-teen-or-young-adult

See also the 4-page tip sheet called Involving Teens and Young Adults in Selecting Assistive Technology at:
http://ctdinstitute.org/library/2017-02-14/involving-teens-and-young-adults-selecting-assistive-technology

Tribal Sovereignty and Treaty Making

(2016, November) |  Useful to Parent Centers and other service providers working with American Indian/Alaska Native families.

In this brief, NAPTAC (the Native American Parent Technical Assistance Center) explores:

  • what sovereignty is,
  • how and why it applies to federally recognized tribes,
  • what sovereignty means to Indian nations, and
  • key points for Parent Centers to remember.

In a companion brief, NAPTAC discusses how outreach to Native tribes can be adjusted to remain in keeping and in accord with the reality of Native sovereignty.

Tribal Sovereignty and Treaty Making is available in HTML, Word, and PDF formats, accessible at:
http://naptac.org/resources/publications/tribal-sovereignty-and-treaty-making/

The companion brief from NAPTAC, called Tribal Sovereignty and Outreach to Native Families, is available at:
 http://naptac.org/resources/publications/tribal-sovereignty-and-outreach-to-native-families/

 

 

Tribal Sovereignty and Outreach to Native Families

(2016, November) |  Useful to Parent Centers and other service providers working with American Indian/Alaska Native families.

In this brief, NAPTAC (the Native American Parent Technical Assistance Center) explores how Parent Centers might plan and conduct outreach to Native families within the reality of tribal sovereignty and the governing policies of individual tribal communities. The brief:

  • explains what sovereignty is and how it might impact the outreach activities that Parent Centers use to connect with Native communities;
  • discusses how Tribal Education Departments might contribute to the outreach activities of Parent Centers; and
  • offers some considerations for meeting and working with tribal leaders and community services staff.

The brief is available in HTML, Word, and PDF formats, accessible at:
http://naptac.org/resources/publications/tribal-sovereignty-and-outreach-to-native-families/

See also the companion brief from NAPTAC, called Tribal Sovereignty and Treaty Making, at:
http://naptac.org/resources/publications/tribal-sovereignty-and-treaty-making/ 

 

 

Bullying and Cyberbullying: What American Indian and Alaska Native Parents Need to Know

(2016, December) | Useful to Parent Centers working with Native communities.

NAPTAC, the Native American Parent Technical Assistance Center, developed this information package on bullying and cyberbullying expressly for Parent Centers to use and share with the American Indian or Alaska Native families with whom they work. Resources in the package include:

Fact sheet about bullying, specific to the Native American community and to Native children with disabilities | 4 pages | Available in HTML, Word, and PDF
http://naptac.org/resources/publications/bullying/

Fact sheet about cyberbullying, also specific to American Indian and Alaska Native families and children with disabilities | 4 pages | Available in HTML, Word, and PDF
http://naptac.org/resources/publications/cyberbullying/

Resource list on bullying and cyberbullying of Native youth, which identifies agencies and organizations addressing bullying and cyberbullying, bullying prevention programs, publications on bullying and cyberbullying, and websites to visit on these two subjects | 4-pages | Available in HTML, Word, and PDF
http://naptac.org/resources/for-parent-centers/resources-on-bullying/

Back to top

.

ESSA Implementation Toolkit: Improving Education Outcomes for Children and Youth in Foster Care

(2017, January) |  Useful to Parent Centers, states, and counties involved with students in foster care.

This toolkit for ESSA implementation is a product of the Legal Center for Foster Care and Education. The toolkit is a series of adaptable tools and resources for states and counties in supporting the school stability and success of students in foster care.  (The contents of the toolkit are described further below.)

Download the toolkit from:
http://www.fostercareandeducation.org/AreasofFocus/EducationStability.aspx

Background
In December 2015 the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) became the latest reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). For the first time, the law included several provisions for students in foster care. Most of these
provisions went into effect December 10, 2016.

What the Toolkit Includes

  • A basic Question and Answer fact sheet about the foster care provisions of ESSA
  • A short summary of the detailed joint guidance issued from the U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services related to the foster care provisions of the law
  • Two checklists to support child welfare and education agencies in understanding their roles and responsibilities around implementation
  • A Model MOU that can be adapted by state child welfare and education agencies to implement the law
  • Sample Guidance from a State Department of Education to Local Education Agencies about the law
  • A basic Question and Answer factsheet about Points of Contact in child welfare and education agencies to support students in foster care
  • A checklist of considerations, including sample forms, for making best interest determinations to support stability
  • A guide about creating transportation plans between Local Education Agencies and child welfare agencies, with corresponding sample templates
  • An appendix with relevant federal child welfare and education laws and guidance

Back to top

Buzz from the Hub | February 2017 | Number 1

Buzz from the Hub, February 2017, No. 1

Elementary school African-American boyTheme: Significant Disproportionality

This issue of the Buzz from the Hub connects you with new resources on significant disproportionality, an ongoing concern in schools districts, especially in special education classification. Your state is now making important decisions about how it will identify and reduce significant disproportionality under IDEA.

We hope that the resources spotlighted in this issue of the Buzz will support the participation of Parent Centers and families in meetings and decision making about how significant disproportionality will be addressed in your state.

All our best to you, as always,

The CPIR Team | Debra, Lisa, Jessica, and Myriam

___________________________

New from the CPIR

One-Stop List of Recent Guidances from the U.S. Department of Education
Looking for a one-stop list to the guidance and resource packages that have come out of the U.S. Department of Education in 2016 and 2017? (It’s been amazing, hasn’t it?) Here you go! CPIR is pleased to offer this list by topic. Disproportionality is definitely on the list!

Back to top

Resources on Disproportionality

5 Things to Know About Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Special Education
Here’s a crash-course intro to disproportionality in special education and why it is so concerning.

What are Success Gaps?
This short video (2-1/2 minutes) defines and gives examples of success gaps in education. Great for sharing with parents participating in your Center’s advocacy to reduce significant disproportionality.

Success Gaps Toolkit
The Success Gaps Toolkit is part of a package of resources that includes materials that a school or district can use to (1) conduct a root cause analysis of why there are gaps in achievement between groups of students, and (2) make a plan for reducing success gaps. Share it with your LEA, SEA, and individual schools.

Parent Engagement Toolkit
This toolkit is a resource for all organizations and community leaders interested in bringing the parent voice into the planning process and the development of local and state action plans addressing the dropout crisis.

Back to top
____________________________________________________________

Logo of the Center for Center for Parent Information and ResourcesThe CPIR hopes that you’ve found useful and relevant resources listed in this month’s Buzz from the Hub. Please feel free to write to the editor, Lisa Küpper, at lkupper@fhi360.org to suggest the types of resources you’d like to see in the future. CPIR is listening! Your input is extremely valuable to helping us to craft newsletters that support your work with families.

Debra, Myriam, Jessica, and Lisa
The CPIR Team

____________________________________________________________

This eNewsletter from the CPIR is copyright-free.
We encourage you to share it with others.

Center for Parent Information and Resources
c/o SPAN, Inc.
35 Halsey St., Fourth Floor
Newark, NJ 07102
http://www.parentcenterhub.org/

Subscribe to the Buzz from the Hub.
See past issues of the Buzz.
____________________________________________________________

Publication of this eNewsletter is made possible through Cooperative Agreement H328R130014 between OSEP and the Statewide Parent Advocacy Network (SPAN). The contents do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Department of Education, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government or by the Center for Parent Information and Resources.

Buzz from the Hub | January 2017

The "cover" of the Stakeholder Guide to the ESSABuzz from the Hub, January 2017, No. 1

Theme: New ESSA Resources

When spiders unite, they can tie up a lion.”
African Proverb

Welcome to the January 2017 edition of the Buzz from the Hub, the newsletter of the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR). Notice the new look? We’ve freshened up our logo and slimmed the newsletter down to a handful of resources at a time to make it easier to read, use, and share. You can now look forward to two issues a month.

This issue of the Buzz connects you with four new CPIR resources on the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) to support participation of Parent Centers and families in decision making about how the law gets implemented in your state.

All our best to you, as always,

The CPIR Team | Debra, Lisa, Jessica, and Myriam

___________________________

New from the CPIR

CPIR Stakeholders’ Guide to the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA)
States have a lot of decisions to make about how they will implement ESSA, the nation’s general education law, and the voices of parents of children with disabilities are critical to the discussion. The Stakeholder Guide (new from CPIR) provides Parent Center staff and their advocacy partners with an understanding of key provisions in ESSA so that they may become meaningfully involved in how the law is now planned and implemented by the states.

Back to top

More CPIR Resources on ESSA

Webinar | ESSA and the Assessment of Students with Disabilities
Our January 5th webinar featured an excellent presentation by Sheryl Lazarus (of the National Center on Educational Outcomes) on the history of including students with disabilities in state assessments and how it has improved outcomes for our students. Did you miss it? No problem. You can still listen, download the presentations, and connect with ESSA resources in your state. Just visit the link above.

Academic Assessments and Students With Disabilities
Check out our new fact sheets on assessment requirements for students with disabilities that are included in ESSA:

These new resources were developed in collaboration with the Advocacy Institute and are based on feedback from Parent Centers and our CPIR Stakeholders Advisory Group.

Back to top
____________________________________________________________

Logo of the Center for Center for Parent Information and ResourcesThe CPIR hopes that you’ve found useful and relevant resources listed in this month’s Buzz from the Hub. Please feel free to write to the editor, Lisa Küpper, at lkupper@fhi360.org to suggest the types of resources you’d like to see in the future. CPIR is listening! Your input is extremely valuable to helping us to craft newsletters that support your work with families.

Debra, Myriam, Jessica, and Lisa
The CPIR Team

____________________________________________________________

This eNewsletter from the CPIR is copyright-free.
We encourage you to share it with others.

Center for Parent Information and Resources
c/o SPAN, Inc.
35 Halsey St., Fourth Floor
Newark, NJ 07102
http://www.parentcenterhub.org/

Subscribe to the Buzz from the Hub.
See past issues of the Buzz.
____________________________________________________________

Publication of this eNewsletter is made possible through Cooperative Agreement H328R130014 between OSEP and the Statewide Parent Advocacy Network (SPAN). The contents do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Department of Education, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government or by the Center for Parent Information and Resources.

Outreach to Native Parents Through Title VI | Fact Sheet and Webinar

(2016/2017) | Useful to Parent Centers in developing and conducting outreach to Native communities.

Two separate products on outreach to Native parents through Title VI are available from NAPTAC, the Native American Parent Technical Assistance Center: (1) A 2016 fact sheet written expressly for Parent Centers and offering many suggestions for how to use Title VI to reach out to Native parents of children with disabilities in nearby communities; and (2) an archived webinar  (with speaker notes) on the same subject (held January 2017).

Access the 3-page fact sheet(PDF) at:
http://naptac.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Outreach-through-TitleVI.pdf

View the webinar at:
https://youtu.be/D-tWEHGtD0c

What is Title VI?

NAPTAC asserts that one underutilized resource for Parent Centers and special educators is the Title VI, Indian Education Program. Originally funded in 1972 (and reauthorized in 1974, 1988, 1992, 1994, 2001, and 2015), the Indian Education Act targets federal funds to improve Indian education in all kinds of schools, but primarily public schools across
the country.

The Act provides services to American Indians and Alaska Natives that are not provided by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Examples include: attendances strategies, counseling, dropout strategies, regular parent/family meetings, transition strategies, and youth activities.

How Title VI Relates to Parent Centers 

Title VI services offer Parent Center multiple ways to connect with Native communities, highlight the support available through Parent Centers, and develop or strengthen relations with local tribes.

Back to top