Archives

Tribal Sovereignty and Treaty Making

(2016, November) |  Useful to Parent Centers and other service providers working with American Indian/Alaska Native families.

In this brief, NAPTAC (the Native American Parent Technical Assistance Center) explores:

  • what sovereignty is,
  • how and why it applies to federally recognized tribes,
  • what sovereignty means to Indian nations, and
  • key points for Parent Centers to remember.

In a companion brief, NAPTAC discusses how outreach to Native tribes can be adjusted to remain in keeping and in accord with the reality of Native sovereignty.

Tribal Sovereignty and Treaty Making is available in HTML, Word, and PDF formats, accessible at:
http://naptac.org/resources/publications/tribal-sovereignty-and-treaty-making/

The companion brief from NAPTAC, called Tribal Sovereignty and Outreach to Native Families, is available at:
 http://naptac.org/resources/publications/tribal-sovereignty-and-outreach-to-native-families/

 

 

Tribal Sovereignty and Outreach to Native Families

(2016, November) |  Useful to Parent Centers and other service providers working with American Indian/Alaska Native families.

In this brief, NAPTAC (the Native American Parent Technical Assistance Center) explores how Parent Centers might plan and conduct outreach to Native families within the reality of tribal sovereignty and the governing policies of individual tribal communities. The brief:

  • explains what sovereignty is and how it might impact the outreach activities that Parent Centers use to connect with Native communities;
  • discusses how Tribal Education Departments might contribute to the outreach activities of Parent Centers; and
  • offers some considerations for meeting and working with tribal leaders and community services staff.

The brief is available in HTML, Word, and PDF formats, accessible at:
http://naptac.org/resources/publications/tribal-sovereignty-and-outreach-to-native-families/

See also the companion brief from NAPTAC, called Tribal Sovereignty and Treaty Making, at:
http://naptac.org/resources/publications/tribal-sovereignty-and-treaty-making/ 

 

 

Bullying and Cyberbullying: What American Indian and Alaska Native Parents Need to Know

(2016, December) | Useful to Parent Centers working with Native communities.

NAPTAC, the Native American Parent Technical Assistance Center, developed this information package on bullying and cyberbullying expressly for Parent Centers to use and share with the American Indian or Alaska Native families with whom they work. Resources in the package include:

Fact sheet about bullying, specific to the Native American community and to Native children with disabilities | 4 pages | Available in HTML, Word, and PDF
http://naptac.org/resources/publications/bullying/

Fact sheet about cyberbullying, also specific to American Indian and Alaska Native families and children with disabilities | 4 pages | Available in HTML, Word, and PDF
http://naptac.org/resources/publications/cyberbullying/

Resource list on bullying and cyberbullying of Native youth, which identifies agencies and organizations addressing bullying and cyberbullying, bullying prevention programs, publications on bullying and cyberbullying, and websites to visit on these two subjects | 4-pages | Available in HTML, Word, and PDF
http://naptac.org/resources/for-parent-centers/resources-on-bullying/

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ESSA Implementation Toolkit: Improving Education Outcomes for Children and Youth in Foster Care

(2017, January) |  Useful to Parent Centers, states, and counties involved with students in foster care.

This toolkit for ESSA implementation is a product of the Legal Center for Foster Care and Education. The toolkit is a series of adaptable tools and resources for states and counties in supporting the school stability and success of students in foster care.  (The contents of the toolkit are described further below.)

Download the toolkit from:
http://www.fostercareandeducation.org/AreasofFocus/EducationStability.aspx

Background
In December 2015 the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) became the latest reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). For the first time, the law included several provisions for students in foster care. Most of these
provisions went into effect December 10, 2016.

What the Toolkit Includes

  • A basic Question and Answer fact sheet about the foster care provisions of ESSA
  • A short summary of the detailed joint guidance issued from the U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services related to the foster care provisions of the law
  • Two checklists to support child welfare and education agencies in understanding their roles and responsibilities around implementation
  • A Model MOU that can be adapted by state child welfare and education agencies to implement the law
  • Sample Guidance from a State Department of Education to Local Education Agencies about the law
  • A basic Question and Answer factsheet about Points of Contact in child welfare and education agencies to support students in foster care
  • A checklist of considerations, including sample forms, for making best interest determinations to support stability
  • A guide about creating transportation plans between Local Education Agencies and child welfare agencies, with corresponding sample templates
  • An appendix with relevant federal child welfare and education laws and guidance

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Buzz from the Hub | February 2017 | Number 1

Buzz from the Hub, February 2017, No. 1

Elementary school African-American boyTheme: Significant Disproportionality

This issue of the Buzz from the Hub connects you with new resources on significant disproportionality, an ongoing concern in schools districts, especially in special education classification. Your state is now making important decisions about how it will identify and reduce significant disproportionality under IDEA.

We hope that the resources spotlighted in this issue of the Buzz will support the participation of Parent Centers and families in meetings and decision making about how significant disproportionality will be addressed in your state.

All our best to you, as always,

The CPIR Team | Debra, Lisa, Jessica, and Myriam

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New from the CPIR

One-Stop List of Recent Guidances from the U.S. Department of Education
Looking for a one-stop list to the guidance and resource packages that have come out of the U.S. Department of Education in 2016 and 2017? (It’s been amazing, hasn’t it?) Here you go! CPIR is pleased to offer this list by topic. Disproportionality is definitely on the list!

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Resources on Disproportionality

5 Things to Know About Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Special Education
Here’s a crash-course intro to disproportionality in special education and why it is so concerning.

What are Success Gaps?
This short video (2-1/2 minutes) defines and gives examples of success gaps in education. Great for sharing with parents participating in your Center’s advocacy to reduce significant disproportionality.

Success Gaps Toolkit
The Success Gaps Toolkit is part of a package of resources that includes materials that a school or district can use to (1) conduct a root cause analysis of why there are gaps in achievement between groups of students, and (2) make a plan for reducing success gaps. Share it with your LEA, SEA, and individual schools.

Parent Engagement Toolkit
This toolkit is a resource for all organizations and community leaders interested in bringing the parent voice into the planning process and the development of local and state action plans addressing the dropout crisis.

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Logo of the Center for Center for Parent Information and ResourcesThe CPIR hopes that you’ve found useful and relevant resources listed in this month’s Buzz from the Hub. Please feel free to write to the editor, Lisa Küpper, at lkupper@fhi360.org to suggest the types of resources you’d like to see in the future. CPIR is listening! Your input is extremely valuable to helping us to craft newsletters that support your work with families.

Debra, Myriam, Jessica, and Lisa
The CPIR Team

____________________________________________________________

This eNewsletter from the CPIR is copyright-free.
We encourage you to share it with others.

Center for Parent Information and Resources
c/o SPAN, Inc.
35 Halsey St., Fourth Floor
Newark, NJ 07102
http://www.parentcenterhub.org/

Subscribe to the Buzz from the Hub.
See past issues of the Buzz.
____________________________________________________________

Publication of this eNewsletter is made possible through Cooperative Agreement H328R130014 between OSEP and the Statewide Parent Advocacy Network (SPAN). The contents do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Department of Education, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government or by the Center for Parent Information and Resources.

Buzz from the Hub | January 2017

The "cover" of the Stakeholder Guide to the ESSABuzz from the Hub, January 2017, No. 1

Theme: New ESSA Resources

When spiders unite, they can tie up a lion.”
African Proverb

Welcome to the January 2017 edition of the Buzz from the Hub, the newsletter of the Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR). Notice the new look? We’ve freshened up our logo and slimmed the newsletter down to a handful of resources at a time to make it easier to read, use, and share. You can now look forward to two issues a month.

This issue of the Buzz connects you with four new CPIR resources on the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) to support participation of Parent Centers and families in decision making about how the law gets implemented in your state.

All our best to you, as always,

The CPIR Team | Debra, Lisa, Jessica, and Myriam

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New from the CPIR

CPIR Stakeholders’ Guide to the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA)
States have a lot of decisions to make about how they will implement ESSA, the nation’s general education law, and the voices of parents of children with disabilities are critical to the discussion. The Stakeholder Guide (new from CPIR) provides Parent Center staff and their advocacy partners with an understanding of key provisions in ESSA so that they may become meaningfully involved in how the law is now planned and implemented by the states.

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More CPIR Resources on ESSA

Webinar | ESSA and the Assessment of Students with Disabilities
Our January 5th webinar featured an excellent presentation by Sheryl Lazarus (of the National Center on Educational Outcomes) on the history of including students with disabilities in state assessments and how it has improved outcomes for our students. Did you miss it? No problem. You can still listen, download the presentations, and connect with ESSA resources in your state. Just visit the link above.

Academic Assessments and Students With Disabilities
Check out our new fact sheets on assessment requirements for students with disabilities that are included in ESSA:

These new resources were developed in collaboration with the Advocacy Institute and are based on feedback from Parent Centers and our CPIR Stakeholders Advisory Group.

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____________________________________________________________

Logo of the Center for Center for Parent Information and ResourcesThe CPIR hopes that you’ve found useful and relevant resources listed in this month’s Buzz from the Hub. Please feel free to write to the editor, Lisa Küpper, at lkupper@fhi360.org to suggest the types of resources you’d like to see in the future. CPIR is listening! Your input is extremely valuable to helping us to craft newsletters that support your work with families.

Debra, Myriam, Jessica, and Lisa
The CPIR Team

____________________________________________________________

This eNewsletter from the CPIR is copyright-free.
We encourage you to share it with others.

Center for Parent Information and Resources
c/o SPAN, Inc.
35 Halsey St., Fourth Floor
Newark, NJ 07102
http://www.parentcenterhub.org/

Subscribe to the Buzz from the Hub.
See past issues of the Buzz.
____________________________________________________________

Publication of this eNewsletter is made possible through Cooperative Agreement H328R130014 between OSEP and the Statewide Parent Advocacy Network (SPAN). The contents do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Department of Education, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government or by the Center for Parent Information and Resources.

Outreach to Native Parents Through Title VI | Fact Sheet and Webinar

(2016/2017) | Useful to Parent Centers in developing and conducting outreach to Native communities.

Two separate products on outreach to Native parents through Title VI are available from NAPTAC, the Native American Parent Technical Assistance Center: (1) A 2016 fact sheet written expressly for Parent Centers and offering many suggestions for how to use Title VI to reach out to Native parents of children with disabilities in nearby communities; and (2) an archived webinar  (with speaker notes) on the same subject (held January 2017).

Access the 3-page fact sheet(PDF) at:
http://naptac.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Outreach-through-TitleVI.pdf

View the webinar at:
https://youtu.be/D-tWEHGtD0c

What is Title VI?

NAPTAC asserts that one underutilized resource for Parent Centers and special educators is the Title VI, Indian Education Program. Originally funded in 1972 (and reauthorized in 1974, 1988, 1992, 1994, 2001, and 2015), the Indian Education Act targets federal funds to improve Indian education in all kinds of schools, but primarily public schools across
the country.

The Act provides services to American Indians and Alaska Natives that are not provided by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Examples include: attendances strategies, counseling, dropout strategies, regular parent/family meetings, transition strategies, and youth activities.

How Title VI Relates to Parent Centers 

Title VI services offer Parent Center multiple ways to connect with Native communities, highlight the support available through Parent Centers, and develop or strengthen relations with local tribes.

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Autism Spectrum Disorder: Evidence-Based Practices

(2016 | 2017) | Useful to Parent Centers for sharing with schools and parents of children on the autism spectrum.

Two training modules are available from the IRIS Center on evidence-based practices for educating children with autism spectrum disorder.

Autism Spectrum Disorder (Part 1): An Overview for Educators provides information on the early signs of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), as well as an overview of the difference between a medical diagnosis and an educational determination of ASD. Resources include notes on instructional considerations for teachers who have children and students with ASD in their classrooms, as well as things to keep in mind when working with the families of those children and students (Est. completion time: 2 hours).

Autism Spectrum Disorder (Part 2): Evidence-Based Practices highlights strategies that have been shown to be effective in teaching appropriate behaviors and skills and decreasing inappropriate behaviors with children and youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). It next explores several strategies that are particularly effective with young children, elementary and middle school students, and high school students (Est. completion time: 3 hours).

Parent Engagement Toolkit

(2016) Handouts available in English and Spanish  | Useful to Parent Centers in supporting parent engagement in state and local dropout prevention efforts and other state or local initiatives.

Parents and caregivers are arguably the most important stakeholders in a child’s educational success. With nearly 1.3 million students dropping out of high school each year, the Annie E. Casey Foundation and America’s Promise Alliance developed this toolkit to engage parents in dropout prevention and development strategies to ensure the success of all children.

The toolkit is a resource for all organizations and community leaders interested in bringing the parent voice into the planning process and the development of local and state action plans addressing the dropout crisis. It is intended to provide a set of resources to effectively reach out to parents, solicit their perspectives and engage them in the development of strategies that will lead to educational success for their children.

Access the toolkit and all its many accompanying resources, at:
http://www.americaspromise.org/parent-engagement-toolkit

One-Stop List of Recent Guidances from the U.S. Department of Education

January 2017
A resource list for Parent Centers

Looking for a one-stop list to the guidance and resource packages that have come out of the U.S. Department of Education in 2016? (It’s been amazing, hasn’t it?) Here you go! Our list is organized by topic, as follows:

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Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder under Section 504

OCR guidance clarifying the obligation of schools to provide students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) with equal educational opportunity under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973

Date released | July 26, 2016

What’s included | Dear Colleague letter, a Know Your Rights fact sheet in several languages

Available in | English, Arabic, Spanish, and Vietnamese

Read abstract in the Hub and access all associated resources, at:
http://www.parentcenterhub.org/repository/dear-colleague-letter-and-resource-guide-on-students-with-adhd/ 

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Behavior Supports for Students with Disabilities

Dear Colleague Letter on Supporting Behavior of Students with Disabilities

Date released | August 1, 2016

What’s included | Dear Colleague letter (16 pages, PDF, 493 kb)
2-page Summary for Stakeholders (2 pages, PDF, 605 kb)

Supporting materials available from CPIR 
Webinar: IDEA Behavioral Support and Discipline
Handout: On Supporting Behavior
Handout | Important Links Mentioned in Dear Colleague Letter (Word, 16 kb)

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Charter Schools

There are 2 resource packages from the Department on students with disabilities in charter schools. One was released in May 2014, and the other (listed first below) was released in December 2016.

2016 | Rights of Students with Disabilities in Public Charter Schools

Date released | December 28, 2016

What’s included
Dear Colleague letter (41 pages, PDF, 570 kb) entitled Frequently Asked Questions about the Rights of Students with Disabilities in Public Charter Schools under Section 504

Dear Colleague letter (34 pages, PDF, 562 kb) entitled Frequently Asked Questions about the Rights of Students with Disabilities in Public Charter Schools under IDEA

2-page fact sheet (2 pages, PDF, 100 kb) entitled Know Your Rights: Students with Disabilities in Charter Schools

Additional resources from the Department 
Webinar | Rights of Students with Disabilities in Public Charter Schools
Transcript of webinar (31 pages, PDF, 261 kb)
Presentation slides from webinar (45 slides, PDF, 459 kb)

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2014 | Dear Colleague Letter: Charter Schools

Date released | May 14, 2014

Read abstract in the Hub and access the Dear Colleague letter, at:
http://www.parentcenterhub.org/repository/dear-colleague-letter-charter-schools/

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Children with Disabilities in Foster Care

Nonregulatory Guidance on Ensuring Educational Stability for Children in Foster Care

Date released | June 23, 2016

Summary | Jointly released by the U.S. Department of Education and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, this guidance is intended to inform states, districts, and child welfare agencies on the new provisions of the ESSA for supporting children and youth in foster care.  The guidance aims to assist state and local partners in understanding and implementing the new law and to inform state and local collaboration between educational and child welfare agencies for the well-being of those in foster care.

Access the guidance (28 pages, PDF, 494 kb), at:
https://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/essa/edhhsfostercarenonregulatorguide.pdf

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Children with Disabilities in Nursing Homes

Dear Colleague Letter on Children with Disabilities Residing in Nursing Homes

Date released | April 26, 2016

Access the Dear Colleague Letter (7 pages, PDF, 325 kb), at:
https://www2.ed.gov/policy/speced/guid/idea/memosdcltrs/dcl-children-in-nursing-homes-04-28-2016.pdf

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Discipline (including Use of Restraint and Seclusion)

See also:  Behavior Supports for Students with Disabilities (above)

Ending Corporal Punishment | Open Letter from the Secretary of Education to Governors and Chief State School Officers

Date released | November 22, 2016

Summary | U.S. Education Secretary John King Jr. issued this open letter urging state leaders to end the use of corporal punishment in schools, a practice repeatedly linked to harmful short-term and long-term outcomes for students.

What’s included
The Secretary’s Letter (5 pages, PDF, 73 kb)
https://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/school-discipline/files/corporal-punishment-dcl-11-22-2016.pdf

Corporal Punishment: Where? Data Map | The Department also released this new Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC) data map that shows where more than 110,000 students across the country were subjected to corporal punishments in 2013–14.

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Dear Colleague Letter: Restraint and Seclusion of Students with Disabilities

Date released | December 28, 2016

Summary | Dear Colleague Letter explains the limits that federal civil rights laws impose on the use of restraint and seclusion by public elementary and secondary school districts.

What’s included
Dear Colleague Letter (24 pages PDF, 408 kb)
https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/letters/colleague-201612-504-restraint-seclusion-ps.pdf

Fact Sheet (2 pages, PDF, 163 kb)
https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/dcl-factsheet-201612-504-restraint-seclusion-ps.pdf

Restraint and Seclusion Resource Document from 2012 (45 pages, PDF, 1.6 MB)
The Department’s resource document (issued May 15, 2012) suggested best practices to prevent the use of restraint or seclusion, recommending that school districts never use physical restraint or seclusion for disciplinary purposes and never use mechanical restraint, and that trained school officials use physical restraint or seclusion only if a child’s behavior poses imminent danger of serious physical harm to self or others.
https://www2.ed.gov/policy/seclusion/restraints-and-seclusion-resources.pdf

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Disproportionality and Discrimination

There are multiple packages from the Department on discriminatory practices with respect to students with disabilities, including its publication of final regulations for addressing significant disproportionality. We’ve listed each separately below, in the order in which they were released in 2016. 

See also | Discipline (above)

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Dear Colleague Letter: Preventing Racial Discrimination in Special Education

Date | December 12, 2016

Context | The guidance addresses the unfortunate fact that the enforcement experience of the Office for Civil Rights “continues to confirm: (1) over-identification of students of color as having disabilities; (2) under-identification of students of color who do have disabilities; and (3) unlawful delays in evaluating students of color for disability and their need for special education services.”

What’s included 
Dear Colleague Letter (25 pages, PDF, 449 kb)
https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/letters/colleague-201612-racedisc-special-education.pdf

Fact Sheet (2 pages, PDF, 157 kb)
https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/dcl-factsheet-racedisc-special-education.pdf

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Final Regulations for IDEA on Promoting Equity and Reducing Significant Disproportionality and Discriminatory Practices in Special Education

Date released | December 19, 2016

Context |  The Department of Education sets forth final rules for: (a) Section 300.646 of IDEA (Disproportionality) and Section 300.647 (Determining significant disproportionality).

What’s available |  Final regulations in PDF (587 kb) and in HTML.  A 3-page summary of changes made from the proposed rule to the final rule (PDF, 411 kb).

Note! To read the final regulations, skip to the last 2 pages of the PDF file. Everything preceding those 2 final pages is a discussion of comments received by the Department on its proposed regulations and an analysis of the changes made in these final regulations.

Regulations in PDF

Regulations in HTML

Changes From Proposed Rule to Final Rule on Significant Disproportionality

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Early Childhood Education

Several guidances and resource pages were released in 2016 and 2017 with respect to early childhood practices, policies, inclusion, and nondiscrimination. We’ve listed them below in the order in which they were released. 

ED-HHS Policy Statement on Family Engagement from the Early Years to the Early Grades

Date released | May 5, 2016

Summary | The Departments recognize the critical role of family engagement in promoting children’s success in early childhood systems and programs. The policy statement reviews the research base and best practices that support effective family engagement in children’s learning, development, and wellness. It also identifies core principles of effective family engagement practices, provides recommendations to early childhood systems to implement effective family engagement, and highlights resources to build programmatic and family capacity to be effective partners.

What’s included
The policy statement is available online (25 pages, PDF, 443 kb), at:
https://www2.ed.gov/about/inits/ed/earlylearning/files/policy-statement-on-family-engagement.pdf

There’s also an Executive Summary (5 pages, PDF, 215 kb), at:
https://www2.ed.gov/about/inits/ed/earlylearning/files/policy-statement-on-family-engagement-executive-summary.pdf

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Early Learning and Educational Technology Policy Brief

Date released | October 2016

Summary | The U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services released a policy brief on the use of technology with early learners to help families and early educators implement active, meaningful, and socially interactive learning.

Access the Policy Brief (25 pages, PDF, 1.5 MB), at:
https://tech.ed.gov/files/2016/10/Early-Learning-Tech-Policy-Brief.pdf

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Early Learning in ESSA: Expanding Opportunities to Support Our Youngest Learners (Non-Regulatory Guidance)

Date released | October 2016

Summary | The U.S. Department of Education released this non-regulatory guidance to remind state and local decision-makers about the importance of investing in early learning. It highlights the opportunities available under ESSA to strengthen early education, and provides examples of how states and local communities can support young children’s success in school.

Access the guidance (37 pages, PDF, 1.1 MB), at:
https://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/essa/essaelguidance10202016.pdf

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Understanding the Confidentiality Requirements Applicable to IDEA Early Childhood Programs: Frequently Asked Questions

Date released |  October 2016

Access the FAQ guidance (15 pages, PDF, 284 kb) at:
https://www2.ed.gov/policy/speced/guid/idea/memosdcltrs/idea-confidentiality-requirements-faq.pdf

See also | Webinar (held December 15, 2016): A Little Privacy Please? Safeguarding the Privacy of Young Children with Disabilities under IDEA and FERPA

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Dear Colleague Letter: Preschool LRE

Date released | January 9, 2017

Context | Reaffirms the commitment of the U.S. Department of Education to inclusive preschool education programs for children with disabilities. Reiterates that the least restrictive environment (LRE) requirements of IDEA  are fully applicable to the placement of preschool children with disabilities. Includes additional information on the reporting of educational environments data for preschool children with disabilities and the use of IDEA Part B funds to provide special education and related services to preschool children with disabilities.

Access the Dear Colleague Letter (8 pages, PDF, 287 kb) at:
https://www2.ed.gov/policy/speced/guid/idea/memosdcltrs/preschool-lre-dcl-1-10-17.pdf

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Homeless Children

Education for Homeless Children and Youths Program (Non-Regulatory Guidance)

Date released | July 27, 2016

What’s included | Guidance letter (51 pages), Fact sheet (4 pages) called Supporting the Success of Homeless Children and Youths: A Fact Sheet and Tips

Read abstract in the Hub and access the guidance on homeless children, at:
http://www.parentcenterhub.org/repository/education-for-homeless-children-and-youths-program-non-regulatory-guidance/

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Policy Statement on Meeting the Needs of Families with Young Children Experiencing and At Risk of Homelessness

Date released | October 31, 2016

Summary | This policy statement comes jointly from the U.S. Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS), Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and Education (ED). The statement recommends ways early childhood and housing providers at the local and state levels can collaborate to better meet the needs of pregnant women and families with young children who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness.

Access the policy statement (39 pages, PDF, 994 kb), at:
https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/ecd/echomelessnesspolicystatement.pdf

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Juvenile Justice

Toolkit: Improving Outcomes for Youth With Disabilities in Juvenile Corrections

Date released | November 2016

Summary | This toolkit includes evidence- and research-based practices, tools, and resources that educators, families, facilities, and community agencies can use to better support and improve the long-term outcomes for youth with disabilities in juvenile correctional facilities. The toolkit includes several resources that the Department released in 2014, including Guiding Principles for Providing High-Quality Education in Juvenile Justice Secure Care Settings and State Correctional Education Self-Assessment (SCES).

Access the toolkit online at:
https://www.osepideasthatwork.org/jj

See also: CPIR’s September 2016 webinar, Reaching and Serving Students with Disabilities in Juvenile Justice


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School Resource Officers

Dear Colleague Letter on the Use of School Resource Officers (SROs) in Schools

Date released | September 8, 2016

Summary | This letter expresses the Department’s increasing concern that school discipline is being administered by school resource officers (SROs), who are law-enforcement officers based in schools.

Access the DCL online:
https://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/guid/secletter/160907.html

See also | CPIR’s Brief for Parent Centers on School Resource Officers

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Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act

Parent and Educator Resource Guide to Section 504 in Public Elementary and Secondary School

Date released |  December 2016

Summary | The resource guide provides a broad overview of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The guidance describes school districts’ nondiscrimination responsibilities, including obligations to provide educational services to students with disabilities. It also outlines the steps that parents can take to ensure that their children secure all of the services they are entitled to receive.

What’s included |  The guide is available online (52 pages, PDF, 651 kb)
https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/504-resource-guide-201612.pdf

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Stakeholder Engagement in ESSA

Dear Colleague Letter on Stakeholder Engagement During Implementation of ESSA

Date released | June 23, 2016

Summary | The purpose of this letter is to highlight the importance and utility of stakeholder engagement as States and local school districts transition to and, eventually, implement the ESSA, and to provide guidance, resources, and examples of stakeholder engagement for States and districts to consider.

What’s included | The letter is online in HTML format, at:
https://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/guid/secletter/160622.html

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Virtual schools

Dear Colleague Letter on Online and Virtual Schools and IDEA

Date released | August 5, 2016

Summary | This DCL reminds states to ensure that students with disabilities attending public virtual schools are getting the special education and supports  they deserve. The guidance focuses on specific requirements in the Individual with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) for public virtual schools.

Access the “Virtual Schools” guidance (6 pages, PDF, 336 kb), at:
https://www2.ed.gov/policy/speced/guid/idea/memosdcltrs/dcl–virtual-schools–08-05-2016.pdf

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