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“ADVANCING EQUAL ACCESS!” Celebrating the 25th Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act

On Friday, July 24, 2015, in celebration of the 25th Anniversary of the landmark Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights will bring together policy and program leaders, community organizations, and youth to examine current implications of the ADA’s implementation and cross-cutting issues with other federal civil rights laws, and plant the seeds for the next 25 years of achieving new milestones to advance civil rights for people with all types of disabilities.

Key events:
9:00am to 9:45am: Presentations by Assistant Secretary for Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services Michael Yudin, Association for University Centers on Disabilities Executive Director Andrew “Andy” J. Imparato, and Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights Catherine E. Lhamon.
9:45am to 10:20am: Youth panel moderated by Rehabilitation Services Administration Commissioner Janet LaBreck and including youth with different types of disabilities who have grown up in the era of the ADA’s implementation.
10:25am to 10:55 am: Outdoor ceremony, keynoted by Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and featuring Active Policy Solutions Chief Executive Officer Terri Lakowski.
10:00am to 10:25am; 10:55am to 12:00pm: Information tables hosted by Federal Government agencies and other organizations wanting to network with disability community members and their families to provide internship and employment opportunities, render services and support, and share information of use to civil rights advocates and their organizations. Also featured are activity stations of interest to persons with disabilities interested and athletics and sports.

Location: Lyndon Banes Johnson Building
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202

There will be something here for everyone; so, come and be a part of history! #ADA25

RSVP here. (Open link in Google Chrome.)

Buzz from the Hub | June 2015

mother comforting child

Focus on Helping Children Cope with Trauma

Welcome to the June 2015 edition of Buzz from the Hub, the newsletter of the Center for Parent Information and Resources—the CPIR.  We hope your summer is off to a great start!

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See other issues of the Buzz 

New Resources in the Hub

What’s new in the resource library? Here are 2 resources we’ve recently added.

Diplomas Count.
The 2015 edition of Education Week’s Diplomas Count report–Next Steps: Life After Special Education—explores the experiences of students with disabilities as they transition from the K-12 education system to a more independent adult life. The report highlights the challenges and opportunities awaiting these students.

Self-Determination: Research to Practice series.
This series describes key issues in developmental disabilities that can be enhanced to promote self-determination. Seven issues are being produced, each focused on a specific topic: self-advocacy, health, employment, community services, aging, family support, and siblings. Each issue includes definitions, a brief review of the literature, promising practices, and applied examples.

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Spotlight on…PTSD and Helping Children Cope with Trauma

Post-traumatic stress disorder has been in the news a lot in the past year, from veterans returning from duty to helping children understand and cope with traumatic events. June is PSTD Awareness Month. Here are several resources you can use and share on PTSD.

What is PTSD? | In English and in Spanish.
The National Center for PTSD can tell you—and connect individuals, friends, families, and veterans with a network of professionals to help.

PSTD in children.
From Medscape, this article looks at the “practice essentials” for diagnosing and addressing PTSD in children. It’s a good read for professionals and parents alike; it’s easy to read, yet framed from a clinician’s point of view.

Tips for talking with and helping children and youth cope after a disaster or traumatic event.
This guide can help parents, caregivers, and teachers learn more about the common reactions children and youth have to trauma, how to respond in a helpful way, and when (and where) to seek support.

Helping young children cope after exposure to a traumatic event.
Tragedies are especially distressing to families with young children. This resource from Zero to Three is designed to help parents navigate this very challenging time. It includes symptoms a child might display, suggestions for what parents can do, and several resources they can turn to for more information.

Home management strategies for PTSD.
What parents can do to help their child cope with trauma and the anxiety that may result. Very practical, very basic.

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Resources You Can Share with Families

This section of the Buzz identifies useful resources you might share with families or mention in your own news bulletins.

“Babies on the Homefront” | Mobile App.
(Available in English and Spanish) Zero to Three’s “Babies on the Homefront” is a free, downloadable app designed specifically for military and veteran parents of young children. The app offers an array of written and video information to share with families, including behavior tips, parent-child activities, and parental self-care strategies.

Help paying for prescription drugs.
There are several programs that help people with disabilities, seniors, and people with low incomes pay for prescription drugs. Find out more in this resource from disability.gov.

5 ways to support siblings in special needs families.
When one child has challenges that disrupt family life, the other children are affected. This article from Child Mind gives tips for helping siblings get what they need to thrive, too.

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For SSIPs Targeting Improved Reading Proficiency

As you may know, the vast majority of states (n=43) have chosen “improving the reading/literacy proficiency of students with disabilities” as their State-Identified Measurable Result (SIMR) to be addressed in the new State Systemic Improvement Plan (SSIP).

So, what evidence-based practices exist for improving student reading proficiency and English language arts proficiency? What might Parent Centers contribute to the discussions that will now begin taking place, as states define what improvement strategies and evidence-based practices they’re going to use to achieve their SIMR? Hopefully, the resources below will inform!

How most children learn to read.
First, the basics. What do we know about how most children learn to read, and how do reading skills and tasks progress as they go through school? These basics underlie and overlap with most all discussions and decisions about reading effectiveness and instruction.

And when there are difficulties in learning to read?
It’s mystifying to parents and professionals alike when some children have difficulty learning to read. When and why does the reading process break down? Here, from PBS, is a brief, to-the-point discussion of the most common factors involved.

Best Evidence Encyclopedia: Reading.
The Best Evidence Encyclopedia informs educators and researchers about the strength of the evidence supporting reading programs available for students in grades K-12. Check it out, including what the research finds effective for beginning reading, upper elementary, middle/high school, English language learners, and struggling readers. Consult the evidence on the effectiveness of technology in reading, too. You’ll see all these choices down the left menu, under “Reading.”

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Upcoming CPIR Webinar | July 9th | Writing for the Web

Write for the Web the Way People Read on the Web
Is your Parent Center looking at revamping its website? Updating the resources you share there? Then the July webinar is for you!

The upcoming webinar focuses on how to write for the web, based on how people read on the web. (Hint: They don’t.) The webinar will help you address one critical aspect of the Parent Center priority on “Use of Technology in Service Provision.”

Date: Thursday, July 9, 2015
Time: 3 pm Eastern
Join online at: http://tadnet.adobeconnect.com/cpir/
Conference line: 1-877-512-6886, code 1825 1825 18

We look forward to seeing you on the 9th! Until then, CPIR wishes you a delightful 4th of July!

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Logo of the Center for Center for Parent Information and ResourcesThe CPIR hopes that you’ve found useful and relevant resources listed in this month’s Buzz from the Hub. Please feel free to write to the editor, Lisa Küpper, at lkupper@fhi360.org to suggest the types of resources you’d like to see in the future. CPIR’s listening! Your input is extremely valuable to helping us to craft newsletters that support your work with families.

Our very best to you,

Debra, Indira, Lisa, and Myriam
The CPIR Team

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This eNewsletter from the CPIR is copyright-free.
We encourage you to share it with others.

Center for Parent Information and Resources
c/o SPAN, Inc.
35 Halsey St., Fourth Floor
Newark, NJ 07102
http://www.parentcenterhub.org/

Subscribe to the Buzz from the Hub.
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Publication of this eNewsletter is made possible through Cooperative Agreement H328R130014 between OSEP and the Statewide Parent Advocacy Network (SPAN). The contents do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Department of Education, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government or by the Center for Parent Information and Resources.

College and Career Readiness for Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities

(2013, September)  This 2-pager from the National Center and State Collaborative describes what “college and career readiness” means for students with significant cognitive disabilities and why a “college and career ready” education is important for success in the community.

Find the article at: http://ncscpartners.org/Media/Default/PDFs/Resources/Parents/NCSC-College-and-Career-Readiness-summary-9-10-13.pdf

Common Core State Standards and Assessments | Application to Students with Disabilities

This 2-page resource answers the question: How do the Common Core State Standards apply to students with disabilities?

Answer: Just as the CCSS applies to all students in school, the standards also apply to students with disabilities. The standards themselves do recognize that implementation requires providing students with disabilities with a range of needed supports. In this document, Application to Students with Disabilities, the standards indicate that instruction for students with disabilities must incorporate supports and accommodations, including:

  • supports and related services designed to meet students’ unique needs and enable their access to the general education curriculum;
  • an IEP that includes annual goals aligned with and chosen to facilitate their attainment of grade-level academic standards; and
  • teachers and specialized instructional support staff who are prepared and qualified to delivery high-quality, evidence-based, individualized instruction and support services.

Additional supports would be provided as needed, including:

  • instructional strategies based on the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL); and
  • assistive technology devices and services that enable access to the standards.

The Application to Students with Disabilities is available online at:
http://www.corestandards.org/assets/application-to-students-with-disabilities.pdf

Crash Course in Infographics

Easel.ly’s  new guide is full of handy information, best practices, and tips and tools. You’ll find all the information you need to start making your infographics or to make your next infographic even better.

Find the guide at: https://s3.amazonaws.com/InfographicBook/CompleteGuideToInfographics.pdf

Don’t forget to also check out our webinar on how to create an infographic. Find the archived webinar at http://www.parentcenterhub.org/repository/webinar-infographics/

2015 Diplomas Count | Next Steps: Life After Special Education

The 2015 edition of Education Week’s Diplomas Count report—Next Steps: Life After Special Education—explores the experiences of students with disabilities who are coming of age at a time when they, like all high school students, are increasingly expected to perform to high academic standards and to prepare for further education or training and a productive role in the workplace. This 10th installment of the annual report highlights the challenges and opportunities awaiting these students as they transition from the K-12 education system to a more independent adult life.

Find the 2015 report at: http://www.edweek.org/ew/toc/2015/06/04/index.html

Research to Practice in Self-Determination Series

The purpose of this series, Research to Practice in Self-Determination, is to describe key issues in the field of developmental disabilities that can be enhanced to promote self-determination. A series of seven issues is being produced, each focusing on a specific topic: self-advocacy, health, employment, community services, aging, family support, and siblings.  The format of this series includes:

  • definitions,
  • a brief review of the literature,
  • promising practices,
  • applied examples, and
  • targeted recommendations for scaling-up efforts.

The series is intended for use by people with developmental disabilities, family members, professionals, state and federal agencies, and academic programs. By collaborating with and enabling each of these entities, the goal of full inclusion for people with developmental disabilities can be realized.

Access the different issues of the series at: http://www.ngsd.org/everyone/research-practice-self-determination-issues

The Condition of Education 2015

The U.S. Congress has mandated that the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) produce an annual report to help inform policymakers about the progress of education in the United States. Using data from across the center and from other sources of education data, The Condition of Education 2015 presents 42 key indicators on important topics and trends in U.S. education. These indicators focus on population characteristics, such as educational attainment and economic outcomes, participation in education at all levels, as well as aspects of elementary, secondary, and postsecondary education, including international comparisons.

This report also includes a new feature—The At a Glance—that allows readers to quickly make comparisons within and across indicators. Access the the interactive Report at: http://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/

The PDF can be found at: http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2015/2015144.pdf

Buzz from the Hub | May 2015

Boy leaping for joy in the hot summer sun

Are you ready to leap into summer?

Welcome to the May 2015 edition of Buzz from the Hub, the newsletter of the Center for Parent Information and Resources—the CPIR. This month’s issue spotlights resources to get us ready and carry us through the coming summer!

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See other issues of the Buzz 

New Resources in the Hub

What’s new in the resource library? Here are 2 resources we’ve recently added.

Final rule: States must maintain their expenditures on special education.
On April 28, 2015, regulations for Part B of IDEA were amended—specifically, the requirements governing MOE (maintenance of effort). The new rule requires LEAs to spend at least as much on special education as they did the prior year, details what happens if an LEA fails to do so, spells out what the MOE will be for the year following a failure, and provides 4 clear exceptions to the requirement that LEAs maintain their fiscal support for special education. This info is important for Parent Centers to know!

AccessCollege: The Student Lounge.
Transitioning from high school to college includes two phases: (a) preparing for college, including testing, securing financial aid, and choosing your postsecondary school; and (b) succeeding in college, which requires numerous self-management skills. This new item in the hub lists many resources for students with disabilities to prepare for and to succeed in college.

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Spotlight on…Summer!

Soon it will be summer, and new adventures and opportunities await. How to enrich our children’s lives, prevent summer “slide,” squeeze in a vacation, and ensure safety are of great interest now. So…here are a few resources for you and the families you serve.

10 ways to prevent summer slide.
Children can lose up to 3 months of academic progress over the summer, and nobody wants that! Here are 10 things families can do to help their child avoid the summer slide.

What’s the National Summer Learning Association have to say?
Explore the NSLA’s website for great ideas and connections about camps, community initiatives, what the research has to say about summer learning, best practices in summer programs, funding, and much more.

Top 10 summer activities for kids with special needs.
Summer can be a challenging time for children with special needs and their parents. Many families face a decrease in school and therapeutic hours. This may leave parents with extra time to fill during the day. AbilityPath.org created this list of summer activities that don’t require weeks of planning, a small loan, or traveling further than the backyard.

A special needs pre-flight checklist: 16 things parents need to do before heading to the airport.
The title says it all. If you have families who are going by plane with a child who has special needs, share this checklist with them.

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What Do You Think of the Buzz?

CPIR would very much like to hear what you think of the monthly Buzz. Is it on target for your Parent Center? What types of resources would you like to see included? How can we craft this newsletter so that it’s useful and relevant and timely for your work with families? Please let us know via our less-than-5-minute survey.

Thank you! We’ll include this feedback in our continuation report and use it when creating future Buzzes.

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Resources You Can Share with Families

This section of the newsletter identifies useful resources you might share with families or mention in your own news bulletins.

When (and how) to tell kids they have Asperger’s.
This resource gives parents tips on ways to talk about the diagnosis to help their child process this important information in the most empowering way.

Managing problem behavior at home.
Child Mind offers this parent guide to more confident, consistent and effective parenting when behavior is an issue.

Thinking about “doing” college online?
There are over 1,000 colleges that offer at least a Bachelor’s degree online. People can study any one of 100 different subjects without ever setting foot on campus. Some programs focus on rural students; other programs focus on commuter students. Some deliver live video feeds of an on-campus class. Others have an online environment that encourages chatting and forum interactions. This website, Bestschools.org, explores the world of online colleges and offers great tools for students and families, especially:

Financial Aid Guide for Online Students

How to Make Sense of Online College Rankings

Online College Costs: A Breakdown of Tuition and Fees

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Resources Just for Parent Centers: It’s Your Summer, Too!

Is summer a time of year when Parent Center work slows down? Of course not! There’s always so much to do, learn, and know, so you can assist the families who come to you for information and training.

Hopefully, you’ll get a chance to put aside the crush of day-to-day duties and indulge in your own learning. If so, you may find these resources make for good reading and sharing.

The top 10 special education blog posts of all time!
Blogs are strange animals, aren’t they? It’s nice to have someone point to the BEST of the posts dealing with disabilities and special education. And here they are, courtesy of the Friendship Circle.

Special needs apps are great, but…which one suits this child?!
With over 1,000 apps now available to help individuals with special needs, it has become increasingly difficult to find and choose the right special needs app. The Friendship Circle App Review gives parents, educators, and others the ability to find the perfect special needs app for a given child.

For special needs advocates: A guide on reaching out to politicians.
Parent Centers are the ultimate special needs advocates. Surely this guide is for you!

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Missed the Webinar on Creating Infographics?

No problem! It’s archived!
If you missed our webinar on how to create infographics and it’s a topic that interests you, visit the CPIR’s Webinar Archives, where you can:

  • listen to the live demonstration,
  • download the guidebook we shared, and
  • connect with the base template we created to showcase the 2014 activities of your Parent Center.

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Alerts and Announcements

Sad news to share | The passing of Pat Haberbosch.
We are very sorry to share this news: On May 11th, Pat Haberbosch passed away. Pat has been the executive director of WVPTI Inc. (West Virginia Parent Training and Information) and Family to Family Health Center where she spent 25 years devoting her life to helping families of children with disabilities. You will be sorely missed, Pat.

June 2nd deadline | Submit a proposal to present at TASH’s 2015 conference.
The theme of TASH’s 2015 Annual Conference (scheduled for December 2-4 in Portland, Oregon) is “Celebrating 40 Years of Progressive Leadership.” Interested in submitting a proposal to TASH for making a presentation at the conference? Deadline’s coming up, June 2nd! Find out more at: http://tash.org/2015-cfp/

CPIR’s New Webinar Schedule.
It’s become obvious that CPIR’s schedule for the webinar series (the first Thursday of every other month) isn’t going to work out well in the coming months (e.g., July 2nd, September 3rd). So we’ve decided to change the schedule to the SECOND Thursday of every other month.

We hope the new schedule works for you. (If not, please remember that the webinars are always archived, so you can catch them anytime.) The NEW webinar schedule to put on your calendar is:

July 9, 2015 | Thursday, 3 pm Eastern time
September 10, 2015 | Thursday, 3 pm Eastern time
November 12, 2015 | Thursday, 3 pm Eastern time

Topics are being determined as we speak, so stay tuned!

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Logo of the Center for Center for Parent Information and ResourcesThe CPIR hopes that you’ve found useful and relevant resources listed in this month’s Buzz from the Hub. Please feel free to write to the editor, Lisa Küpper, at lkupper@fhi360.org to suggest the types of resources you’d like to see in the future. CPIR’s listening! Your input is extremely valuable to helping us to craft newsletters that support your work with families.

Our very best to you,

Debra, Indira, Lisa, and Myriam
The CPIR Team

____________________________________________________________

This eNewsletter from the CPIR is copyright-free.
We encourage you to share it with others.

Center for Parent Information and Resources
c/o SPAN, Inc.
35 Halsey St., Fourth Floor
Newark, NJ 07102
http://www.parentcenterhub.org/

Subscribe to the Buzz from the Hub.
____________________________________________________________

Publication of this eNewsletter is made possible through Cooperative Agreement H328R130014 between OSEP and the Statewide Parent Advocacy Network (SPAN). The contents do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Department of Education, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government or by the Center for Parent Information and Resources.