This resource file (also available in spreadsheet format was compiled by the Juvenile Justice Workgroup (see Acknowledgements below), who researched and vetted every item in the list for its relevance and usefulness for working with justice involved youth.  (Return to Juvenile Justice Toolkit)


Addressing the Needs of Youth with Disabilities in the Juvenile Justice System: The Current Status of Evidence-Based Research
NCD evaluates the emerging status of key policies and programs that affect children and youth with disabilities who have often been overlooked by service and research programs. The issues of delinquency prevention and juvenile justice as they relate to children and youth with disabilities are relatively new for policymakers, yet they present some of the most complex and challenging problems that policymakers must grapple with and resolve.

Blueprint for Change: Education Success for Youth in the Juvenile Justice System
The Blueprint for Change: Education Success for Youth in the Juvenile Justice System presents 10 goals that set forth the broad framework for promoting education success for young people involved in the juvenile justice system. There are correlating Benchmarks for each Goal that, if achieved, would indicate progress toward improving educational outcomes. The Benchmarks are the more specific and concrete policies and strategies for achieving the broader goals.

Brief for Parent Centers on School Resource Officers
Read This Brief If…the school system in your community, district, or state places (or is considering placing) sworn law-enforcement officers in public schools as part of building a safe learning environment for students.

California Lawmakers Unveil a List of Bills Meant to Keep Children out of the Juvenile Justice System
Article about legislation introduced in CA to avoid STPP

Think Before You Plea—Collateral Consequences for Juvenile Justice state map
An American Bar Association Project to identify, state-by-state, collateral consequences on the involvement of juveniles in the justice systems.  Visitors can locate their state on the map to find specific details and understand state specific juvenile consequences.

Collateral Consequences by state

California Collateral Consequences of Juvenile Delinquency Proceedings
This handbook was written to help juvenile delinquency defense counsel and others who work
with young people in the system to better understand the potential impact of juvenile cases on
affected children’s future educational, vocational, and financial aspirations.

Illinois Juvenile Collateral Consequences Checklist
The purpose of the Illinois Juvenile Collateral Consequences Checklist is to provide attorneys, judges
and other juvenile justice professionals with information on the short and long term consequences of
juvenile adjudications of delinquency in Illinois.

New Jersey Juvenile Collateral Consequences Checklist
The purpose of the New Jersey Juvenile Collateral Consequences Checklist is to provide attorneys, judges, and other juvenile justice professionals, in addition to youth and their families, with the most up-to-date information available on the short-term and long-term consequences of juvenile adjudications of delinquency in New Jersey.

Pennsylvania Juvenile Collateral Consequences Checklist
The purpose of the Pennsylvania Juvenile Collateral Consequences Checklist is to provide
attorneys, judges and other juvenile justice professionals with the most current information
available on the short term and long term consequences of juvenile adjudications of
delinquency.

Correctional Education in Juvenile Justice Facilities
The Correctional Education Guidance Package was published to help states and local agencies aimed at helping states and local agencies strengthen the quality of education services provided to America’s estimated 60,000 young people in confinement every day. This guidance package is part of a number of notable actions from ED and DOJ, who are working together to help communities reduce the number of youth entering the justice system and to ensure that those who have entered the system return to their communities with dignity, skills and viable education and employment opportunities.

Georgia schools employ many cops with troubled records
Article about the backgrounds of School Resource Officers in Georgia

Guideposts for Success for Youth Involved in the Juvenile Corrections System
The Guideposts for Success are a framework to assist the multiple organizations that need to be involved to meet the needs and improve the transition outcomes of all youth including youth with disabilities and to create necessary community webs of support.

Handout | Reaching and Serving Students with Disabilities in Juvenile Justice
This online handout expands upon the information provided in the September 20, 2016 webinar on reaching and serving students with disabilities in juvenile justice. Here, you’ll find connections to resources from: federal agencies, centers on juvenile justice, Parent Centers, and other organizations and entities.

Helping Justice-Involved Youth Transition Back to Traditional School Settings
From the U.S. Department of Education, this suite of resources is intended to help justice-involved youth make a successful transition back to traditional school settings.

Information on the prevalence of learning disabilities in the prison population
Memo with references on the prevalence of learning disabilities in the adult and juvenile prison population. Citations include a link to a free online version, when available. All citations are accompanied by an abstract, excerpt, or summary written by the author or publisher of the document. We have not done an eva

Juvenile InJustice: Charging Youth as Adults is Ineffective, Biased, and Harmful
In this report, we review the process that unfolds when a young person is tried as an adult in California and evaluate the health and equity impacts of charging youth as adults.  Human Impact Partners. February 2017. Oakland, CA.

Juvenile Justice Resource Hub
The Juvenile Justice Resource Hub is a comprehensive source of information on cutting-edge juvenile justice issues and reform trends. Through this website, you can find:  Ready access to reliable, accurate, curated information and analysis on juvenile justice issues, relevant research, best practice models, policy levers for reform,Toolkits and action-oriented documents, experts in the field.

National Juvenile Defense Center
The National Juvenile Defender Center (NJDC) provides national leadership on juvenile indigent defense and due process deprivations that young people face in the delinquency system by providing training, technical assistance, policy development, community-building, leadership opportunities, legislative advocacy, litigation support, and research.

NJDC
Juvenile Court Terminology

NJDC
Topical Issues Search

NJDC State Profiles
Statutes, court rules, and other policies related to juvenile justice vary significantly by state. Clicking on the map or state names will display information about each jurisdiction.

Orphanages, Training Schools, Reform Schools and Now This?
Children with disabilities are disproportionately placed in the juvenile justice system, receive inadequate treatment, and are denied educational opportunities, the National Disability Rights Network asserts in this report, subtitled “Recommendations to Prevent the Disproportionate Placement and Inadequate Treatment of Children with Disabilities in the Juvenile Justice System.”

OSEP’s Dear Colleague Letter on the Use of School Resource Officers (SROs) in Schools
The Secretary of Education released this Dear Colleague Letter (DCL) to express the Department’s increasing concern that school discipline is being administered by school resource officers (SROs), who are law-enforcement officers based in schools.

Schooling the Police: Race, Disability, and the Conduct of School Resource Officers
A detailed examination of current data, legal imperatives and court cases, disability protections under the law, the history of SROs in our schools, and recommendations for needed training.

State Correctional Education Self-Assessment (SCES)—Revised July 26, 2016
The Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) has developed this voluntary State Correctional Education Self-Assessment (SCES) to assist States in self-assessing their systems for providing special education and related services to students with disabilities in correctional facilities.

Working with the Criminal Defense Lawyer: A Guide for Families
Guide developed by Elizabeth Kelley, Attorney at Law

Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) Provisions for Juvenile Justice–Involved Youth with Disabilities
This presentation by Kate Burdick, Juvenile Law Center & Legal Center for Youth Justice and Education, provides an overview of important provisions in the Every Student Succeeds Act regarding youth involved in the juvenile justice system.

Webinar | Reaching and Serving Students with Disabilities in Juvenile Justice
Presenters: Kate Burdick, Esq., Juvenile Law Center & Peg Kinsell, Co-Director
Hosted by the RAISE Center and the Center for Parent Information and Resources, this webinar offers information and strategies for advocacy and outreach for students with disabilities in juvenile justice systems.

Toolkit for Youth with Disabilities in Juvenile Corrections
This web-based toolkit from the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) at the U.S. Department of Education can help State educational agencies, educators, families, facilities, and community agencies to better support and improve the long-term outcomes for youth with disabilities in juvenile correctional facilities. The toolkit includes topical briefs, family engagement strategies, and resources that summarize evidence- and research-based practices in juvenile corrections.

Toolkit: Improving Outcomes for Youth With Disabilities in Juvenile Corrections
This toolkit includes evidence- and research-based practices, tools, and resources that educators, families, facilities, and community agencies can use to better support and improve the long-term outcomes for youth with disabilities in juvenile correctional facilities. The toolkit includes several resources that the Department released in 2014, including Guiding Principles for Providing High-Quality Education in Juvenile Justice Secure Care Settings and State Correctional Education Self-Assessment (SCES).

New York Center for JJ
NJCJJ Resources page

Youth with Disabilities in Juvenile Corrections Modules: Improving Instruction
Page 1: Education in Juvenile Justice Settings
Page 2: Intake and Treatment Plan Procedures
Page 3: Instructional and Behavioral Challenges

How do teachers address the behavior issues of youth in these settings?
Page 4: Use Positive Behavioral Approaches
Page 5: Create a Behavior Management Plan

How do teachers meet the academic needs of youth in juvenile corrections settings?
Page 6: Foundations of Effective Instruction
Page 7: Use Evidence-Based Practices
Page 8: Incorporate Additional Instructional Practices
Page 9: Provide Accommodations Resources
Page 10: References & Additional Resources
Page 11: Credits

Youth with Disabilities in Juvenile Corrections (Part 2): Transition and Reentry to School and Community
What is transition planning and why is it important?
Page 1: Incarcerated Youth
Page 2: Overview of Transition Planning

How might transition planning evolve during incarceration?
Page 3: Transition Planning at System Entry
Page 4: Transition Planning During Residency
Page 5: Transition Planning for System Exit and Aftercare

What are some emerging findings regarding successful transition?
Page 6: Emerging Findings

Resources
Page 7: References & Additional Resources
Page 8: Credits

Achieving Positive Educational Outcomes for Students in Correctional Settings: Effective Cross-Office and Agency Collaboration
OSEP 2017 Leadership Presentation (.ppt)

Transition Toolkit 3.0: Meeting the Educational Needs of Youth Exposed to the Juvenile Justice System
The third edition of NDTAC’s Transition Toolkit brings together strategies, existing practices, and updated resources and documents on transition to enable administrators and service providers to provide high-quality transition services for children and youth moving into, through, and out of education programs within the juvenile justice system. The strategies are categorized by facility-centered activities, youth-centered activities, family-centered activities, and community/systems-centered activities across all four stages of transition.

The Sentencing Project
The Sentencing Project is a Washington, D.C.-based research and advocacy center working to reduce the use of incarceration in the United States. The Sentencing Project works for a fair and effective criminal justice system by promoting reforms in sentencing policy and addressing racial disparities.

Law Enforcement Access to Student Records: What Is the Law?
Information on what law enforcement is able to access regarding student records and protections related to student records.

 

Return to Juvenile Justice Toolkit

Acknowledgements

The CPIR is grateful to the workgroup that compiled this toolkit for the contribution of their time and expertise. The team examined a multitude of aspects of Juvenile Justice, including:

  • Outreach, intake processes, and technical assistance provided by Parent Centers across the country to inform and share best practices;
  • The extensive barriers and opportunities for both families and Parent Centers to become genuine community-system partners; and
  • The State Correctional Education Self-Assessment (SCES) Tool.

They also reviewed resources related to Juvenile Justice and Students with Disabilities and discussed policies that affect justice involved youth and their families with a look at some of the collateral impact.

Members of the workgroup were Ana Espada (Advocates for Children), Carolyn Hayer (SPAN), Susan Henderson (DREDF), Curtis Jones (Mission Empower), Peg Kinsell (SPAN), and Michelle Phillips (Family Resource Center on Disabilities). We also want to acknowledge the many Parent Center staff members who created the questions for the intake form and the outreach list of potential partners during the CPIR Boot Camp 2017’s workshop on Juvenile Justice.

Thank you, everyone, for your invaluable contributions to this important issue and for enabling the CPIR to provide this toolkit to our Parent Centers in their continued support of children with disabilities and their families.