Supporting the Parent Centers Who Serve Families of Children with Disabilities

 

Featured Resource

Return to School Roadmap: Development and Implementation of IEPs in the Least Restrictive Environment

Adding to its Return to School Roadmap series, the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) at the U.S. Department of Education issues this Q&A document, which highlights certain IDEA requirements related to the development and implementation of IEPs and other information that states, school systems, regular and special education teachers, related services providers, and parents should consider as students with disabilities return to school in Fall 2021.

The 41-page document is the Department's response to the requests it received from a diverse group of stakeholders, asking that the Department issue new guidance interpreting requirements of the IDEA in light of the many challenges of the COVID‑19 pandemic and as more schools and programs are returning to in-person services. Read more about the Q&A, see its Table of Contents, and access it (and other documents in the Roadmap series) in our abstract of this Featured Resource.

Featured Parent Center

SINERGIA Webinars and Workshops for Families and Professionals

Sinergia

The Metropolitan Parent Center (also known as Sinergia) is a federally funded Parent Training and Information Center in New York City. Sinergia, Inc., is a member of the NY Region 1 Parent Training and Information Center (PTIC) Collaborative.

Sinergia offers trainings for families of children and youth with disabilities and the professionals that work with them on a variety of topics related to special education, ranging from one-time workshops on topics of current interest to an intensive advocacy series designed to develop the knowledge and skills of parents to advocate for their own children and assist other parents. Check them out!

Webinars

Putting the DEC-Recommended Practices to Work in Parent Centers: Part Two

In May of 2021, Part 1 of this webinar series introduced attendees to the Division for Early Childhood’s (DEC) Recommended Practices (RPs), which offer guidance to parents and professionals who work with young children who have or are at risk for developmental delays or disabilities. Part 2 of the series built upon the information shared in the first webinar. In Part 2, presenters discussed a variety of practice ways to SHARE the RPs as part of the ongoing work of a Parent Center. Presenters then identified ways  in which Parent Centers can use the RPs in their daily work with families.

Recent Items

10 Basic Steps in Special Education

When a child is having trouble in school, it's important to find out why. The child may have a disability. By law, schools must provide special help to eligible children with disabilities. This help is called special education and related services. There's a lot to know about the process by which children are identified as having a disability and in need of special education and related services. This section of CPIR's website is devoted to helping you learn about that process. This brief overview is an excellent place to start. Here, we've distilled the process into 10 basic steps. Once you have the big picture of the process, it's easier to understand the many details under each step. We've indicated throughout this overview where, on our site, you can connect with that more detailed information.

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