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Taking the Alternate Assessment Does NOT Mean Education in a Separate Setting!

This 4-page Parent Brief from the TIES Center focuses on alternate assessments for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities. As the brief’s title indicates, the fact that a student will be taking the alternative assessment does not mean that he or she then needs to be educated in a separate, non-inclusive setting. The brief reviews IDEA’s least restrictive environment (LRE) provisions and other legal provisions that support inclusion in the regular classroom. It also provides guidance to parents on what to say and stress in the IEP meeting. The brief closes with “Next Steps for Parents” and a short list of additional resources.

Download the brief and find out more about the TIES Center’s other materials for parents.

Speaking of IEPs…Two Modules from the IRIS Center

Our September issue of the Buzz from the Hub focuses on the variety of IEP resources that CPIR offers. In tandem with the Buzz, we are pleased to also spotlight two training modules from the IRIS Center on developing high-quality IEPs. The first is intended for IEP team members to use. (It’s also excellent to use in staff development and training.) The second online module is primarily designed for administrators and offers guidance on supporting the development and implementation of high-quality IEPs.

Both modules explicitly address the higher standard set for FAPE in the March 2019 Supreme Court ruling in Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District. Access both modules here.

Apprenticeship Resources Collection

(2019, August) | Useful to Parent Centers, families, youth, and transition planners regarding work-based training, classroom instruction, and mentorship for youth with disabilities. The RAISE Center has created a resource collection focused on apprenticeship for youth with disabilities. Apprenticeships have been used for centuries to provide hands-on trade skills. Apprenticeship programs provide work-based training, classroom […]

8 Steps to Kicking Off Your Child’s IEP The Right Way

(2019, July) | Available in English and Spanish | Useful for sharing with families of children with disabilities. Whether the child is starting a new school year or has a new Individualized Education Program (IEP), this Great Schools article will help parents how to get things started on the right foot. https://www.greatschools.org/gk/articles/8-steps-to-kicking-off-your-childs-iep-the-right-way/ In Spanish | […]

Providing a High-Quality Education for Students with Disabilities

(2019) | Useful for Parent Center capacity building and for sharing with state and local education leaders and advocates The primary mechanism for ensuring that students with disabilities receive the right educational content and rigor at the right moment in their education is the individualized education program (IEP). This resource from the Council of Chief […]

Back-to-School Introduction Letters

For parents of children with disabilities, writing a back-to-school introduction letter to their child’s teacher can help get the school year off to a good start. Parents can use such a letter to share important facts about their son or daughter, what accommodations the child is to receive, and any specifics of his or her IEP. Understood.org provides two model letters to guide parents (one to introduce grade-schoolers and another to introduce middle-schoolers). Both are available in English and Spanish. View or download the letters here.

Using Data to Make Parents Partners in School Improvement Efforts

ESSA requires states and districts to rate schools based on multiple data points (measures) that collectively comprise a state’s “accountability system.” What does it mean when a school is rated as “low performing”?

This short blog emphasizes the importance of parents being informed about and understanding the data measures used to rate schools, so that they can be partners in school improvement activities. The blog also connects you with a 2019 report, which takes a look at how many schools were identified as “struggling” based on ESSA’s requirements. Read the blog and access multiple related resources on school data, report cards, and the value of parent involvement.

Webinar | Early Childhood Suspensions: The Impact on Families

When a child is suspended from school, it not only impacts the child, but the entire family. Parents often feel isolated and ashamed. They may also feel defeated with nowhere to turn. Many parents worry about the impact of the suspension on the child’s future, losing their job to care for the child during the suspension period, their child being targeted, and their child’s ability develop and maintain positive relationships with teachers and peers. During this 52-minute webinar, parents share the impact of their child’s suspension(s) on the family.

Read more about this webinar and its companion webinar, both of which are part of the National Center for Pyramid Model Innovations Let’s Talk series.

Understanding ESSA: A Parents’ Guide to the Nation’s Landmark Education Law

(2018, August) | Useful to Parent Centers for sharing with the families they serve, to better parental understanding of ESSA and their role in advocating for how it is implemented in their state. This 19-page Parents’ Guide to ESSA comes from the U.S. Department of Education with the stated purpose of helping parents understand the […]

Parent and Educator Guide to School Climate Resources

(2019, April) | Useful to Parent Centers, educators, families, and school systems interested in how to initiate or expand school climate improvement activities. The Parent and Educator Guide to School Climate Resources, from the U.S. Department of Education, is intended to provide parents, teachers, administrators, and other interested parties with: a general understanding of school climate, […]

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