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Developmental Disabilities | Discapacidades del Desarrollo

When a baby or preschooler lags far behind, doesn’t reach key developmental milestones, or loses a previously acquired skill, it’s reasonable to suspect a mental or physical problem serious enough to be considered a developmental disability. These pages in English and Spanish appearing on the HealthyChildren.org website provide authoritative guidance on developmental disabilities, developmental milestones at various ages, and what parents and professionals need to know or do. Each page is actually a suite of articles in both languages about specific disabilities that are considered as developmental disabilities. Perfect for sharing with the English and Spanish-speaking families and communities you serve!

See the full list of articles and find links to both the English and Spanish suites.

Practice Guides for Families

The ECTA Center offers a collection of Practice Improvement Tools to support early childhood specialists in using evidence-based practices with young children experiencing developmental delays or disabilities. This large set of tools includes Family Practice Guides that practitioners can share with families to illustrate recommended practices that can be used at home. There are more than 25 guides available, on topics ranging from parent involvement in their child’s assessment, learning activities for the child that parents can provide, and teaming with professionals.

Each of the guides is available in English and Spanish and comes with a brief video, a scenario, and changes to expect as a result of using the practices with a given child. Find out more about, and access, the Family Practice Guides here.

Milestones Photo and Video Library

Children reach milestones in how they play, learn, speak, act, and move (rolling over, for example, or crawling, standing, walking, talking). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) maintain a free online library of photos and videos that capture the milestones of development that young children might be expected to achieve at various ages–skills such as taking a first step, smiling for the first time, and waving “bye bye.”

The photo library is part of CDC’s larger information suite Milestones in Action, which also includes fact sheets on developmental milestones and on developmental delay; a developmental checklist; the Milestone Tracker app; and more. Each resource is available in English and Spanish.

Interested? Read more about (and access) Milestones in Action here.

Basic Information about Trauma

A resource collection compiled by and for Parent Centers. Coordinated by the Region 2 Parent Technical Assistance Center @ ECAC September 2018 The contents of this page will help Parent Centers, families, and others build their knowledge base and understanding of what trauma is, what kinds of trauma there are, and how it affects children in […]

Measuring What Matters | Medición de lo importante

(2018, July) | Useful to Parent Centers and early childhood programs tracking family progress toward expected outcomes. Using data to track family and program progress is an essential part of strengthening parent, family, and community engagement (PFCE). Tthis three-part webinar series from the National Center on Parent, Family, and Community Engagement (NCPFCE) describes how programs […]

Child Outcomes Summary Process Module | Collecting and Using Data to Improve Programs

Useful to Parent Centers in learning about or informing families about the Child Outcomes Summary process used by early intervention and early childhood special education staff. This online learning module from ECTA Center and DaSy provides key information about the child outcomes summary (COS) process and the practices that contribute to consistent and meaningful COS decision-making. […]

Helping Children with Congenital Cytomegalovirus (CMV)

When a baby is born with cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, it is called congenital CMV infection. About 1 out of every 200 babies are born with congenital CMV infection. Women can pass CMV to their baby during pregnancy.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), only about 1 in 5 babies with congenital CMV infection will be sick from the virus or will have long-term health problems, but those problems can include hearing loss, vision loss, intellectual disability, muscular weakness, and even seizures.

Find out more about the two-article CDC resource (available in English and Spanish) and connect with its website devoted to CMV.

Ayuda para los Bebés Hasta Su Tercer Cumpleaños

Actualizado, septiembre de 2017 En inglés | In English   El nacimiento de un niño es un evento lleno de emociones que le cambiará la vida por completo. Un nuevo bebé hermoso llega a su hogar, familia, y comunidad. Es un tiempo para celebrar. Sus familiares conocen al niño y se preguntan: ¿Va a ser un […]

Not Just Soft Skills: How Young Children’s Learning and Health Benefit from Strong Social-Emotional Development

(2017, May) | Useful to: Parents and caregivers seeking to better understand and manage their children’s behavior, and foster a loving and responsive relationship with them. Available in English and Spanish.   The Too Small to Fall Initiative has released a white paper, Not Just “Soft Skills”: How Young Children’s Learning & Health Benefit from Strong Social-Emotional […]

Small Children Have Big Feelings

(2017) | Useful to Parent Centers working with families of babies and young children. Great for sharing! When parents talk, read, and sing with their children in sensitive, loving, and responsive ways, they build their children’s brain and help them develop the social-emotional skills they need to succeed in school and life. Research shows that […]

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